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San Diego Floral Association

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Favorite Tool: Plastic Spray Tank

Reprinted from: January/February 2011 Volume 102, Number 1
© SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION. This story may not be published in any form or copied onto another website without written permission from San Diego Floral Association.


Plastic Spray Tank

 

This is a difficult question but I have to say it is my plastic Gilmour Spray Tank. It is not the ‘tool’ I use the most but it saves me so much time controlling weeds (and other things). No hoeing, no bending down and pulling the little devils out. Just mix the spray, pump the handle about a dozen times and I’m ready to go. I most often spray Remuda (which is generic RoundUp and costs way less). Remember this product will kill almost any plant it gets on, so you need to be careful around desirable plants. Sometimes I “mask off” with a piece of corrugated cardboard that I carry with me.

Also, with a sprayer like this, you can use selective herbicides to kill broad leaf weeds in your lawn. There is also a spray that will kill unwanted grass in ornamental plants. I spray the grass growing in ice plant and don’t worry about killing the ice plant. This product really saves a lot of time–and your back. Just be certain to buy the proper herbicide for your particular problem, and mix it carefully. Adding a wetting agent improves results.

When you’re finished spraying, always dump out any unused spray, and wash the tank with soapy water. Also run the soapy water through the spray valve and wand to clean them. Some chemicals will jell or plug things up. So it’s easier to do a simple cleaning than take the sprayer all apart later.

If you keep the sprayer really clean, it can be used for dormant sprays and other insect controls when you spot a problem. Remember concentrated sprays cost a lot less than the ready to use type.

Look for the Gilmour two-gallon sprayer at Walter Andersen Nursery in Point Loma and Poway. Cost is $30.

-Walter Andersen, Jr., owner of Walter Andersen Nursery


© SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION. This story may not be published in any form or copied onto another website without written permission from San Diego Floral Association.


 

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